TPP Framework

Team Park Project has developed an original approach – the TPP Framework – that encompasses all phases of amusement park development.

The TPP Framework was born out of the need to overcome the traditional, purely creative, and architectural approach to amusement park design.

In short, by studying visitor flows in advance – using mathematical constructs – it is possible to predict the size and movement of crowds within the park, thus optimizing visitor routes and increasing profitability.

In short, by studying visitor flows in advance – using mathematical constructs – it is possible to predict the size and movement of crowds within the park, thus optimizing visitor routes and increasing profitability.

he TPP Framework was born out of the need to overcome the traditional, purely creative, and architectural approach to amusement park design.

The first phase of the TPP Framework is about listening to clients to understand their needs, expectations, ambitions, and budget.

We ask the client to complete a specially structured questionnaire to help us gather information and structure the activities that need to be put in place to meet the project requirements.

Market analysis involves the research and processing of various qualitative information, including the study of the regional demographics: population, culture, habits, and spending power.

Competitors and benchmarks are analysed, as well as weather conditions, public and school holidays. The results of the analysis are summarised in a document designed to inform the client of the social, environmental, and competitive context in which the amusement park will be located.

In the park planning phase, we calculate preliminary parameters that are useful and necessary to define the actual size of the park and its ancillary services.

One of the key parameters is the ‘Design Day’: the expected number of visitors on the peak day of a high season week.

The design day, together with other similar parameters, makes it possible to define the size of the park, but also the number and size of the elements necessary for its operation, not only attractions and food outlets, but also car parks, entrances, and restrooms.

In this phase, the theme of the park and the storytelling are defined. There are certain rules that we follow in the concept phase:

  • Facilitate the link with the local area, its history, and customs; this also makes it possible to develop Choose the optimal mix of simplicity, recognisability, originality, and atmosphere to satisfy the collective imagination.(edutainment) through which students can learn while having fun, and the park increases the number of school-age visitors.
  • Choose the optimal mix of Choose the optimal mix of simplicity, recognisability, originality, and atmosphere to satisfy the collective imagination. to satisfy the collective imagination.

In this phase, the project area and its road system are analysed, and initial assessments are made regarding parking and access.

Using the values obtained in the planning phase, the size of each macro-area is determined. The storytelling is used to create a bubble design that ideally distributes the thematic areas defined in the concept.

The connections between the different areas are also defined here, which will later determine the dynamics of flows.

The masterplan is an essential document that defines the layout of the park. Once the various themed areas have been appropriately dimensioned to control costs and avoid dispersion, the attractions are selected.

This choice must be balanced between the budget and the expectations of the visitors. All the elements (attractions and ancillary functions) are then added to the masterplan according to key principles: landscaping, atmosphere, expectation, and separation from the outside world.

At this stage, it is crucial to effectively define visitor and service flows to ensure the future success of the park.

In the entertainment industry, theming defines the set design and construction activities that provide the framework for the architectural and mechanical components.

Theming is a particularly delicate matter that must be approached with great care to avoid budget overruns.

Given the high cost of theming, at Team Park Project we like to think of it as an element at the service of the storytelling, which must never jeopardise the profitability of the project.

 

All the elements analysed and compiled so far contribute to the development of the business plan—an indispensable tool for assessing the sustainability and profitability of the park.

The business plan for creating a park should not be conventional, or at least it ought not to be. This is because the park is a complex and unique structure, with inherent challenges that can quickly undermine even the best business plans, especially those based on wishful thinking and lacking the pragmatism that comes from years of sector experience.

To uphold the profitability perspective that sets it apart, Team Park Project incorporates both scientific elements and benchmarks, drawing on historical data accumulated worldwide in the field of amusement park design. These elements significantly reduce the approximations typical of conventional business plans, thereby avoiding unpleasant surprises for investors once the park is up and running.

Designing a park means designing movement, the movement of attractions, but above all the movement of people.

In this phase, the TPP framework stands out for its ability to design the visitor experience holistically: an experience that clearly includes not only the enjoyment of the attractions, but also the food, the rest stops, the merchandising and, last but not least, the ease of parking.

As with the other phases of the TPP Framework, the design of the user experience is also based on the dogma of profitability; from this point of view, it is important to be able to offer visitors the possibility of purchasing services to progressively improve their experience in the park, without, however, arriving at a commercial intrusiveness or excessive gratuitousness of the services offered.

Prediction, control, speed, and flexibility: these are the key words that characterise the management of a park. It must be perfectly designed and implemented to be profitable.

In this respect, Team Park Project has solid experience in the management of both parks designed entirely by TPP and parks built by third parties, where TPP has intervened to optimise management, reporting directly to investors on the results of its intervention.

Kaizen is a Japanese term made up of the syllables KAI (change, improvement) and ZEN (good, better). Kaizen therefore refers to the concept of constant and continuous improvement.


Every theme park has a specific and indispensable need for management – or management supervision – aimed at the virtuous circle of continuous improvement. Analysing results, listening to customers and staff, and making decisions with an eye to improvement must be codified in the DNA of the management team.


This is because, on the path laid down by the great Walt Disney, small, imperceptible improvements are the high road to profitability, which cannot and must not be seen as an optional extra, but as an inherent characteristic of each successful amusement park.

Find out
how we
can help

Contact us

Name(Required)
* Required fields

This site is registered on wpml.org as a development site. Switch to a production site key to remove this banner.